ARREST LOG Wilmington Police Make 1 Arrest Issue 1 Summons

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — According to Wilmington Police Logs, Wilmington Police issued the following arrests and summonses between May 24, 2018 and May 30, 2018:Thursday, May 24NoneFriday, May 25NoneSaturday, May 26NoneSunday, May 27NoneMonday, May 28Aline C. Castro (54, Woburn) — Unlicensed Operation Of A Motor Vehicle (Summons)Tuesday, May 29John H. Carroll (26, Peabody) — OUI Liquor; Negligent Operation Of Motor Vehicle; and Marked Lanes Violation (Arrest)Wednesday, May 30None(DISCLAIMER: This information is public information.  An arrest does not constitute a conviction.  Any arrested person is innocent until proven guilty.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedARREST LOG: Wilmington Police Make 5 Arrests & Issue 4 SummonsesIn “Police Log”ARREST LOG: Wilmington Police Make 2 Arrests & Issue 1 SummonsIn “Police Log”ARREST LOG: Wilmington Police Make 1 Arrest & Issue 2 SummonsesIn “Police Log”last_img read more

Myanmar denies antagonising Bangladesh

first_imgMyanmar Border Guard Police (BGP) personnel have been kept deployed on Myanmar-Bangladesh border Bandarban`s Tombru Photo: Prothom AloMyanmar on Friday reinforced military buildup along the Bangladesh border as thousands of Rohingya Muslims were scattered around the border.The Myanmar troops have been deployed near zero point of the border in violation of international law, Prothom Alo’s Abdul Quddus reported from the frontier area of Tombru in Naikhongchhari.However, AFP reported from Yangon, Myanmar defended deploying fresh troops to a border zone where thousands of Rohingya refugees are camped, blaming a militant threat.Dhaka called for an immediate retreat to lower tensions along the troubled frontier.The increased security presence this week has centred around a strip of “no man’s land” between the two countries where some 6,000 Rohingya sought shelter after fleeing a brutal Myanmar army crackdown last August.The military campaign drove some 700,000 Rohingya across the border in total, with most travelling on to sprawling refugee settlements in Cox’s Bazar.The UN has accused Myanmar of waging an ethnic cleansing campaign against the Muslim minority.Yet Myanmar has staunchly defended the crackdown as an effort to snuff out Rohingya ‘militants’ who raided police posts last year.The recent spike in security along the border is a response to new intelligence about the movement of Rohingya militants, claimed Myanmar government spokesman Zaw Htay.“We acted this way based on the information we got regarding terrorism, especially the ARSA movement,” he told AFP, using an acronym for the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army, a militant group, and declining to elaborate further.“It was not aimed at antagonising Bangladesh,” he added.On Thursday, Bangladesh’s foreign ministry said it summoned Myanmar’s envoy to call for an “immediate pullback of Myanmar security forces along with military assets from the area.”In recent weeks the Rohingya living in the no man’s land strip have faced growing pressure from Myanmar soldiers, who have stepped up patrols along the barbed-wire border fence near the camp and ordered the group to leave over loudspeakers.On Thursday some 100 Myanmar soldiers arrived near the refugee camp in heavy military vehicles, according to Bangladesh border guards and Rohingya.The heightened tensions will do little to speed-up a stalled repatriation plan signed by the neighbours in January.The process was delayed at the last moment due to lack of preparations and protests by the refugees, who fear returning to Myanmar without guarantees of basic safety and citizenship.Myanmar has branded the Rohingya as illegal immigrants from Bangladesh and systematically dismantled their legal rights and access to basic services in Rakhine, a state where they have lived for generations.Read more:Border tension: BGB-BGP in flag meetinglast_img

Myanmar president Htin Kyaw resigns

first_imgMyanmar President U Htin KyawMyanmar’s president Htin Kyaw resigned suddenly on Wednesday leaving the country’s de facto leader Aung San Suu Kyi without a close confidant and political ally as she faces rising international opprobrium over the Rakhine crisis.The president, an old school friend of Suu Kyi, served as her proxy in an office she was barred from occupying under Myanmar’s military-drafted constitution.His role was largely ceremonial with Suu Kyi calling the shots within her civilian administration, under the self-appointed title of State Counsellor.But he was nonetheless the country’s head of state and a key domestic ally for Suu Kyi within her party.Myanmar’s vice president Myint Swe, a retired general close to the former junta leader Than Shwe, will temporarily move into the role until a new president is in place, according to the constitution.Observers say this will likely make some inside Suu Kyi’s ruling National League for Democracy (NLD) party queasy as, in theory, decisions could be pushed through – or held back – in this time.Speculation had swirled for months about the health of Htin Kyaw, 72, who had recently lost weight and has had heart problems in the past.“Myanmar president U Htin Kyaw resigned on 21March 2018,” a statement on the president’s official Facebook page said.His office did not give many details for why he resigned Wednesday, only saying that “he wanted to take a rest from his current duty”.It added that a new leader will be selected “within seven working days”.Shortly after the announcement, speaker of the lower house and Suu Kyi ally Win Myint resigned from his position, narrowing his odds of taking up Myanmar’s top civilian office.“Anyone she selects as president will be someone she has complete trust in,” said independent analyst Richard Horsey.“That trust is the basis of her being the seat of power in Myanmar. She has no power under the constitution. Any power comes from that relationship with the president.”Loyal school friendHtin Kyaw, the country’s first civilian president since 1962, was widely respected and seen as unerringly devoted to Suu Kyi, who said she would rule “above” him after he was elected in 2016.He has stood firmly by her side even as as her reputation has been shredded internationally for not speaking up on behalf of the persecuted Rohingya Muslim community.A violent military crackdown has forced some 700,000 Rohingya to flee over the border into squalid camps in Bangladesh, in what the UN has branded “ethnic cleansing” with possible “hallmarks of genocide”.The military justifies its campaign as a legitimate response to Rohingya militant attacks against police posts in August.The civilian government is in a transitional power-sharing arrangement with the army which still retains huge political and economic power.The army controls three key ministries-home affairs, borders and defence-effectively giving it a carte blanche to conduct any security operations it chooses.It also has a quarter of legislative seats reserved for officers, giving the military a de facto veto over any constitutional change.Defenders of Suu Kyi say her government’s hands are tied by the military but critics maintain it could and should have done more to speak up against alleged army atrocities, particularly in Rakhine state.Domestically Suu Kyi still enjoys broad popular support but, two years into government, her party has disappointed sky-high expectations of rapid development and economic growth, while the Rakhine crisis has recast the international narrative of the country.Htin Kyaw is the son of a revered poet and helped run Suu Kyi’s charitable foundation before taking over the presidency.According to an official biography, he studied at the University of London’s Institute of Computer Science from 1971 to 1972.In a varied career he worked as a university teacher and also held positions in the finance and national planning and foreign affairs ministries in the late 1970s and 80s before retiring from government service as the military tightened its grip.last_img read more

PM Hasina blasts US for issuing red alert

first_imgPrime minister Sheikh Hasina in her introductory speech at Awami League Central Working Committee (ALCWC) meeting at Ganabhaban on Friday. Photo: PIDPrime minister Sheikh Hasina on Friday sharply criticised the USA for issuing an alert on Bangladesh without citing any reason or giving any explanation, reports UNB. “I saw the USA issued a red alert. They didn’t inform us why they issued the alert and gave no explanation either,” she said in her introductory speech at Awami League Central Working Committee (ALCWC) meeting at Ganobhaban. Sheikh Hasina said she has already asked the authorities concerned to look into the matter and find out why the US issued the alert or whether they have any information. “If they’ve any information about any incident that can happen in the coming days, then it’s their responsibility to inform us,” the prime minister said. “They could inform our intelligence agencies so that we could take steps.” Hasina said terrorism is a problem for the whole world. “Bangladesh contained terrorism and militancy successfully. After one incident we’re very much alert and our intelligence agencies are working round the clock. If they (the US) have any information, they should inform the appropriate authority,” she said. The prime minister said Bangladesh is in the top five growth attaining countries and it is natural that those who did not want the country’s independence will not want to see the country advancing smoothly socioeconomically. “They hatched conspiracies in the past, but we’re advancing and we’ll be advancing. Everyone has to work so that our march towards success continues,” she said. The US embassy on Wednesday issued a fresh alert for its citizens living in Bangladesh. “In light of calls for revenge in the wake of the 15 March terrorist attack against on mosques in New Zealand, we encourage US citizens to exercise heightened awareness of the ongoing threat posed by transnational terrorist organisations such as ISIS and al-Qa’ida,” it said in a statement.Terrorist groups, their associates, and those inspired by such organisations remain intent on attacking US and western citizens around the world, including in Bangladesh, it mentioned.It also requested its citizens to review their personal security plans as well to be aware of their surroundings.”Stay alert in locations frequented by Westerners and monitor local media for updates,” it added.last_img read more

The price of innocence

first_imgIndia International Centre will be screening the film The Price of Providence, directed by Merajur Rahman Baruah on June 20 at the Centre’s Auditorium. The director will also introduce the film which will be followed by a discussion.The film is about the city Detroit’s corruption that puts Dwayne Provience in prison for a crime he did not commit. It took the hard work of strangers and nothing short of a miracle to regain his freedom. Corruption and incompetence, having devolved the city into bankruptcy, once again stand in Dwayne’s way today as he seeks to gain compensation for the decade he spent in prison as an innocent man. Through it all, Dwayne keeps his head up, and fights build up the life that was taken away from him. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’However, with the help of the Michigan Innocence Clinic at the University of Michigan Law School, he regained his freedom after a decade in prison, but his fight for justice continues.Merajur Rahman Baruah is an independent documentary filmmaker from India based in Delhi. He has done Master degree in Sociology, Diploma in Mass Communication from Jamia Millia Islamia, and Film Appreciation course from Film and Television Institute of India, Pune. He has received the Commonwealth Vision Award 2006 as commanded for his film Beyond the Zero Line from the Royal Commonwealth Society and the Commonwealth Broadcasting Association, United Kingdom. He has also received Rajat Kamal for the best film on social issues at the 55th National Film Awards-India and also best director award for his film Shifting Prophecy at the Hyderabad International film Festival 2008. His film The Nine Months won the second best film at Jeevika- Asia Livelihood Documentary film Festival 2010-Delhi.When: June 20Where: India International Centrelast_img read more