Scholarship Fundraiser for children with autism at Mango Reef

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppTurks and Caicos, April 27, 2017 – Providenciales – Tonight features the first Blue Gala of the Hope Autism Awareness Foundation which is raising money for its scholarship fund and the upkeep of its Autism classroom, which is located at the Mills Institute.   The gala is set for Mango Reef restaurant and will also showcase fabulous prizes in a silent auction.   That gets started at 7pm and tickets are $70.#MagneticMediaNews#BlueGalaEvent#HopeFoundationfundraiser Related Items:#BlueGalaEvent, #HopeFoundationfundraiser, #magneticmedianewslast_img

Apple to fix FaceTime bug that allows eavesdropping

first_imgApple to fix FaceTime bug that allows eavesdropping (AP) – Apple has made the group chat function in FaceTime unavailable after users said there was a bug that could allow callers to activate another user’s microphone remotely.The bug was demonstrated through videos online and reported on this week by tech blogs. Reports say the bug in the video chat app could allow an iPhone user calling another iPhone through Group Facetime to hear the audio from the other handset – even if the receiver did not accept the call.“We’re aware of this issue and we have identified a fix that will be released in a software update later this week,” Apple said in a statement Tuesday.Its online support page noted there was a technical issue with the application and that Group Facetime “is temporarily unavailable.”The governor of New York, Andrew Cuomo, released a statement warning people about the bug and urging people to disable the app until Apple fixes the issue.Apple is due to report its latest quarterly earnings later Tuesday amid intense investor interest in the company’s financial health. Earlier this month, Apple said that demand for iPhones was waning and that its earnings for the final quarter of 2018 would be below expectations – a rare downgrade from the company. AP, January 29, 2019 Posted: January 29, 2019 AP Categories: Local San Diego News, National & International News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

Examining the controversy at SANDAG over Transnet Funds

first_img Updated: 5:27 PM Examining the controversy at SANDAG over Transnet Funds KUSI Newsroom Posted: May 13, 2019 May 13, 2019center_img KUSI Newsroom, 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – The year long battle over roads versus transit has taken on a new dimension. The hiring of a new Executive Director at SANDAG, Hasn Ikhrata, has cause tension and division within the agency.KUSI’s Steve Bosh reports that SANDAG determines how Transnet funds from a half cent increase in the sales tax from 2004 is spent on local transportation project, mostly the roads.This attempt by the new executive director to shift funds from promised road projects to transit projects only has caused friction.County Supervisor Kristin Gaspar walked out of last week’s meeting after Ikhrata reportedly tried to silence board members who didn’t support his plan.RELATED STORY: Supervisor Gaspar explains SANDAG’s proposal to install black boxes on all vehicles to track every mile you drive Categories: Local San Diego News, Politics, Traffic & Accidents Tags: SANDAG, Transnet FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

People on the Move 3614

first_imgNick Carbone is now news domain expert at Dataminr. Formerly, he was homepage and breaking news editor at TIME.Mashable has named Josh Dickey editor of its new entertainment vertical. Dickey left TheWrap, where he was managing editor.Saul Rosenberg is now chief content officer at Nielsen. He previously served as a consultant at McKinsey & Company.Akiba Solomon is the new editorial director at Colorlines. She was the brand’s managing editor.HGTV Magazine has named Kate English as associate publisher, marketing. English was previously the magazine’s executive director of integrated marketing.Rick Hamann is the new senior vice president of Onion labs at Onion Inc. He was formerly senior vice president and group creative director at Energy BBDO.Scholastic named Heather McIntosh Cassano as its chief experience officer. Before joining the company she had the same role at Pearson. David Perel has joined Bauer Media as editorial director of In Touch and Life & Style. Perel was previously with AMI, where he served as executive vice president of digital content.M named Jim Windolf as its new editor-in-chief. He was previously serving as a senior consulting editor for the magazine. Peter Goodman left his role as executive business editor at The Huffington Post and joined the International Business Times as editor-in-chief.Guggenheim Media has named Mike Bruno vice president of Billboard.com. He was previously assistant managing editor at Entertainment Weekly. Also, Will Lee joined the company as vice president of digital content for The Hollywood Reporter. Lee was at Penske Media, where he was vice president of strategy.last_img read more

Rodale to Rebrand Organic Gardening Taps James Oseland as EIC

first_imgIn a release, Schulman praises Oseland’s “strong passion for our mission and unmatched expertise in this space. With [Organic Life], Rodale is uniquely able to serve consumers and advertisers in one of the most important and fastest-growing market segments.”Rodale’s Organic Life will be a print and digital brand like no other,” Oselandsays in a releasae. “It will be a community, a clearinghouse ofbeautiful, authoritative information that will weave together food,shelter, gardening, wellness and good living–an intersection of topicsthat lie right at the heart of Rodale and what so many of us careabout.” On Aug. 22, Rodale Inc. president Scott Schulman announced the hiring of James Oseland as editor-in-chief of Organic Gardening in advance of its April/May 2015 relaunch as Organic Life. It will be a multi-platform brand influenced by OG and by Rodale’s former Organic Style, where Oseland was managing editor from 2001-2002.That was before he moved to Bonnier Corp. in 2006 to edit Saveur. His eight years were highlighted by three American Society of Magazine Editors’ National Magazine Awards (2009, 2012 and 2013) and numerousJames Beard Foundation epicurean journalism awards. His 2006 memoir”Cradle of Flavor”, was cited as “best of the year” from both the JamesBeard Foundation and The New York Times.Earlier magazine and media stops included Vogue, Sassy, The Village Voice and Mademoiselle. He also appeared on Bravo’s Top Chef Masters for five years.Oseland is succeeding five-year OG editor-in-chief Ethne Clarke. The 72-year-old OG is the Rodale flagship in a company that also publishes Bicycling, Men’s Health, Women’s Health, Runner’s World and Prevention. At 64, Prevention is Rodale’s second oldest magazine.last_img read more

Police stabbed assailant shot at UK parliament

first_imgPolice tapes off Parliament Square after reports of loud bangs, in London. Photo: ReutersBritish police shot a suspected attacker outside the Houses of Parliament in London on Wednesday after an officer was stabbed in what police said was a “terrorist” incident.The building in the heart of the British capital was immediately sealed off and MPs and staff ordered to remain inside.David Lidington, the leader of parliament’s lower House of Commons who is responsible for arranging government business, told MPs: “What I am able to say to the house is there has been a serious incident.”It seems that a police officer has been stabbed, that the alleged assailant was shot by armed police.”There are also reports of further violent incidents in the vicinity of the Palace of Westminster,” he said.He said he could not go into further details until there was confirmation from the police and security authorities.Prime minister Theresa May is safe, a statement from her Downing Street office said, and she was seen getting into a car and being driven away from parliament.Lidington said an air ambulance was at the scene to take away casualties.TV pictures showed traffic halted on the nearby Westminster Bridge and emergency vehicles swarming around. The busy bridge was completely shut off to traffic.Armed police swarmed to the area which was quickly sealed off to the public.The incident came on the same day that Belgium was marking a year since its most deadly attack, when 32 people were killed in suicide bombings at Brussels Airport and a metro station.In July 2005, four British suicide bombers inspired by Al-Qaeda attacked London’s transport system during rush hour, killing 52 people.Two weeks later, there was an attempt to carry out a second wave of attacks.A spokesman for the House of Commons told AFP: “We can confirm that the sitting has been suspended in the Commons at the moment. We are aware of a security incident that has taken place.”London’s metropolitan police said on Twitter: “We were called at approx 2:40 pm to reports of an incident at Westminster Bridge. Being treated as a firearms incident — police on the scene.”Officers — including firearms officers — are on scene and dealing with the incident.”A staff member in parliament, who did not want to be named, told AFP: “I definitely heard shots. I saw someone in dark clothing go down.”Westminster station on the London Underground train network, which is opposite the Houses of Parliament, was closed over to the incident.Read more:UK parliament in lockdown after ‘shots fired’Assailant shot, at least a dozen injured in incident at UK parliament: Reuterslast_img read more

Hasina expects no help from Trump on Rohingya issue

first_imgBangladesh`s prime minister Sheikh Hasina speaks with a reporter during the United Nations General Assembly in New York City. Photo: ReutersBangladesh prime minister Sheikh Hasina said she spoke to US president Donald Trump on Monday about Rohingya Muslims flooding into her country from Myanmar, but she expects no help from him as he has made clear how he feels about refugees.As Trump left an event he hosted at the United Nations on reforming the world body, Hasina said she stopped him for a few minutes.“He just asked how is Bangladesh? I said ‘it’s doing very well, but the only problem that we have is the refugees from Myanmar’,” Hasina told Reuters in an interview. “But he didn’t make any comment about refugees.”A Myanmar military response to insurgent attacks last month in the country’s Rakhine state sent more than 410,000 Rohingya Muslims fleeing to neighboring Bangladesh, escaping what the United Nations has branded as ethnic cleansing.The Myanmar government says about 400 people have been killed in the fighting.Hasina, who is due to address the annual gathering of world leaders at the United Nations General Assembly on Thursday, said Trump’s stance on refugees was clear, so it was not worth asking him for help with the Rohingya Muslim refugees.“Already America declared that they will not allow any refugees,” she said. “What I can expect from them, and especially (the) president. He already declared his mind … so why I should ask?”“Bangladesh is not a rich country … but if we can feed 160 million people, another 500 or 700,000 people, we can do it.”A senior White House official was unaware of the exchange but said Trump was deeply interested in the subject and that “he would definitely engage if it were brought up.”Shortly after taking office in January, Trump tried to put a 120-day halt on the US refugee program, bar Syrian refugees indefinitely and impose a 90-day suspension on people from six predominantly Muslim countries.“The travel ban into the United States should be far larger, tougher and more specific-but stupidly, that would not be politically correct!” Trump said on Twitter on Friday.Trump says the move is needed to prevent terrorist attacks and allow the government to put in place more stringent vetting procedures. There is a key Supreme Court hearing next month on the constitutionality of his executive order on the ban.About a million Rohingya lived in Rakhine State until the recent violence. Most face travel restrictions and are denied citizenship in a country where many Buddhists regard them as illegal immigrants from Bangladesh.Hasina said she wanted to see more international political pressure on Myanmar to allow the Rohingya to return.“(Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi) should agree that these people belong to her country and that Myanmar is their country. They should take them back,” she said. “These people are suffering.”Nobel laureate Suu Kyi has faced a barrage of international criticism for not stopping the violence. Myanmar national security adviser Thaung Tun told Reuters on Monday that Myanmar would ensure those who left their homes could return, but there was “a process we have to discuss.”US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley urged the Myanmar government to end military operations, grant humanitarian access, and commit to aiding the safe return of civilians to their homes.“People are still at risk of being attacked or killed, humanitarian aid is not reaching the people who need it, and innocent civilians are still fleeing across the border to Bangladesh,” Haley said after Britain hosted a meeting on the crisis in New York on Monday.A US deputy assistant secretary of state, Patrick Murphy, is due in Myanmar this week.last_img

Yemen govt rebels start talks aboard UN ship

first_img.The head of the UN mission in Yemen launched talks between the government and Huthi rebels aboard a boat in the Red Sea on Sunday aimed at shoring up a ceasefire, a government official said.Retired Dutch General Patrick Cammaert chaired the meeting aboard a UN vessel docked off the coast of the flashpoint city of Hodeida after the rebels refused to hold talks in government-held areas, the official told AFP on condition of anonymity.The official said the meeting would address the implementation of an agreement reached in Sweden in December that calls for a ceasefire in rebel-held Hodeida, a pullback of forces from the port city and the opening of humanitarian corridors.The Red Sea port is the entry point for the bulk of Yemen’s imported goods and humanitarian aid, providing a lifeline to millions in the Arab world’s poorest country.The UN said in a statement that the parties would resume discussions on the Sweden agreement on Sunday.It is the third meeting of a joint committee on implementing the deal, which has been hailed as a major step toward ending Yemen’s devastating four-year war.The Saudi-backed government and Iran-aligned Huthi rebels have accused each other of violating the ceasefire, while deadlines for the pullback of forces and a prisoner swap have slipped.Yemen’s rebels have been locked in a war with government forces backed since 2015 by a Saudi-led coalition.The conflict has triggered what the UN calls the world’s worst humanitarian crisis, with millions of people at risk of starvation.Some 10,000 people have been killed since 2015, according to the World Health Organization, although rights groups say the death toll could be five times higher.last_img read more

Santa Fe High School Had A Shooting Plan Armed Officers And Practice

first_img Share REUTERS/Jonathan Bachman/Via Texas TribunePolice tape in front of Santa Fe High School in Santa Fe, Texas on May 20, 2018.They, like so many others, thought they had taken the steps to avoid this.The school district had an active-shooter plan, and two armed police officers walked the halls of the high school. School district leaders had even agreed last fall to eventually arm teachers and staff under the state’s school marshal program, one of the country’s most aggressive and controversial policies intended to get more guns into classrooms.They thought they were a hardened target, part of what’s expected today of the American public high school in an age when school shootings occur with alarming frequency. And so a death toll of 10 was a tragic sign of failure and needing to do more, but also a sign, to some, that it could have been much worse.“My first indication is that our policies and procedures worked,” J.R. “Rusty” Norman, president of the school district’s board of trustees, said Saturday, standing exhausted at his front door. “Having said that, the way things are, if someone wants to get into a school to create havoc, they can do it.”The mass shooting — which killed 10 people and wounded 10 others in this rural community outside Houston — again highlighted the despairing challenge at the center of the ongoing debate over how to make the nation’s schools safer. It also hints at a growing feeling of inevitability, a normalization of what should be impossible tragedies.The gunman in Santa Fe used a pistol and a shotgun, firearms common to many South Texas homes, firearms he took from his father, police said. So there were no echoes of the calls to ban assault rifles or raise the minimum age for gun purchases that came after the shooting three months ago in Parkland, Fla.Most residents here didn’t blame any gun for the tragedy down the street. Many of them pointed to a lack of religion in schools.“It’s not the guns. It’s the people. It’s a heart problem,” said Sarah Tassin, 61. “We need to bring God back into the schools.” Texas politicians are pushing to focus on school security — the hardening of targets. Gov. Greg Abbott said he planned to hold roundtable discussions starting Tuesday on how to make schools even more secure. One idea he and other state officials mentioned was limiting the number of entrances to the facilities. Rep. Randy Weber, R-Friendswood, said Congress eventually would consider legislation focused on “hardening targets and adding more school metal detectors and school police officers.”But the horror in Santa Fe shows that there are limits there, too. Norman said he saw school security as a way to control, not prevent, school violence. And the school district had some practice. In February, two weeks after the Parkland shooting, Santa Fe High went into lockdown after a false alarm of an active-shooter situation, resulting in a huge emergency response. The school won a statewide award for its safety program.“We can never be over-prepared,” Norman said. “But we were prepared.”His school board approved a plan in November to allow some school staff members to carry guns, joining more than 170 school districts in Texas that have made similar plans. But Santa Fe was still working on it, Norman said. People needed to be trained. Details needed to be worked out, such as a requirement that school guns fire only frangible bullets, which break into small pieces and are unlikely to pass through victims, as a way to limit the danger to innocent students.All of these efforts, Norman said, are “only a way to mitigate what is happening.”The search for red flags about the alleged gunman’s intentions continued Saturday — another familiar hallmark of school shootings. Dimitrios Pagourtzis, the 17-year-old student who police said confessed to the shooting, was being held without bond at a jail in Galveston. Wearing a trench coat, he allegedly opened fire in an art class, moving through the room shooting at teachers and students, and talking to himself. He approached a supply closet where students were barricaded inside, and he shot through the windows saying “surprise,” said Isabelle Laymance, 15.The gunman shot a school police officer who approached him, then talked with other officers, offering to surrender. The entire episode lasted a terrifying 30 minutes, according to witnesses and court records.The Pagourtzis family released a statement Saturday saying they are “shocked and confused” by what happened and that the incident “seems incompatible with the boy we love.” Nicholas Poehl, the Galveston attorney for Pagourtzis, said his client appeared “pretty dazed” when he met with him Saturday and that it would take time for him to learn what happened.The alleged gunman’s classmates and parents said they saw no signs of trouble before the shooting, though some said he had seemed somewhat depressed in recent months.Bertha Bland, whose grandson is good friends with Pagourtzis, said she knew the teenager well and described him as “an outstanding kid” and a good student. Scott Pearson, whose son played football with Pagourtzis, described him as a quiet, normal kid. He didn’t talk to him much when he took him home from football practices, but he never got the impression that he was dangerous. He noticed that Pagourtzis regularly wore a trench coat but didn’t think much of it.“Kids do weird stuff,” Pearson said. “I don’t understand when my son wears a hoodie out in 90-degree heat, either.” Pagourtzis improved as a football player between sophomore and junior years, moving from second to first string as a defensive tackle on the junior varsity squad, according to Rey Montemayor, an 18-year old senior quarterback. Pagourtzis spent a lot of time in the weight room. Eventually Pagourtzis, who wore number 69, was doing reps of 185 pounds on the bench press.  “He worked hard,” Montemayor said. “Even got stronger than me.”On the team, Pagourtzis was well liked and respected, even though he mostly kept to himself, ear buds in his ears in the hallways and in the locker room. He was “very normal, cool,” Montemayor said. “He would joke around but was also quiet — not an open book.”Local and federal officials revealed little new information about the shooting or the investigation on Saturday. So far, investigators have not found any link to terrorism or political extremism in the suspect’s background that would offer a motive for the attack, according to a person close to the investigation.The evidence recovered in the first day of the probe suggests that the suspect was a disturbed young man without any particular ideology, though it is still early in the investigation and new facts could emerge, the person said.Authorities here said police reacted as they should have to the shooting incident, praising the initial response, which included two school police officers trying to intervene, though they have not yet provided details of the interaction that led to the teen’s surrender. Galveston County Judge Mark Henry described the quick actions of the school police officers as “very critical.” Santa Fe Independent School District Police Chief Walter Braun said at a news conference that the police officer wounded in the shooting was in “critical but stable condition” at a hospital. He said his officers “did what they were trained for. They went in immediately.”Some students, escorted by police, were briefly allowed back on the school campus to retrieve backpacks and their vehicles. But the high school remained cordoned off as a crime scene.The town did not come to a standstill as it dealt with the aftermath of the shooting: People still ran errands and had yard sales and barbecues. The community library closed “out of respect for the victims,” but organizers of a library benefit sale decided to hold their event as planned in the lobby and parking lot. The Santa Fe High baseball team was still scheduled for a playoff game Saturday night after canceling one on the day of the shooting.The shooting didn’t seem to rattle beliefs or prompt the calls for change that followed the Parkland shooting. Norman Franzke, 69, whose granddaughter safely escaped Santa Fe High, noted that guns have been part of the culture here for generations. When he attended, students kept shotguns on racks in their pickups, ready for hunting after school.“I don’t think this will change the mentality of this community,” Franzke said. “There may be some changes in how kids enter and leave school. But even then, he was a student, so he would still have had access.”At Red Cap restaurant, a popular diner down the road from the high school, the sign outside no longer advertised fried green tomatoes and Boudin balls. It had been changed to read “Prayers for Santa Fe.”Inside, Tassin, who works at Red Cap, teared up as she thought about all the teens and their parents who stop in there. She considers them family. But she didn’t blame guns for Friday’s shooting. She didn’t blame mental health. She didn’t know where to lay blame. There had been so many school shootings. And now, at Santa Fe High. Something was going on, she said. But she didn’t know what.Devlin Barrett, Julie Tate, Alice Crites and Jennifer Jenkins in Washington contributed to this report.last_img read more

Alien life searchers conference SETICon 2 held in Santa Clara

first_imgSETICon 2, a conference unlike any other, ran this past weekend in Santa Clara, California. In attendance were people from all walks of life whose area of interest intersects on the topic of the search for intelligent life somewhere other than here on planet Earth. © 2012 Phys.Org SETI’s Alien Telescope Array (ATA) listens day and night for a signal from space. Credit: SETI Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img Thus, they were made up of scientists; from NASA and other groups, artists, and even entertainers. The goal of the conference, which is set up and run by the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence Institute (SETI) is to share ideas on what has been discovered of late regarding the possibility of life on other planets and what might lie ahead.Fueling much of the discussion this time around (the first SETICon was held in 2010) are findings by NASA’s Kepler mission which is dedicated to looking for extraterrestrial life, regardless of form or degree of intelligence. Since 2009, the mission has uncovered the existence of over 2,300 exoplanets that researchers believe hold the possibility of harboring some forms of life. Most notably, due to the existence of that precious resources without which we here on this planet could not survive: water. Some scientists who actually work on the mission (Geoff Marcy, Jon Jenkins, Debra Fischer, etc.) spoke to those in attendance, as did astronauts Tom Jones and Mae Jemison.This year’s conference, those in attendance noted, was much more upbeat than the last, as more information from Kepler becomes available, the numbers of planets that might have life on them keeps going up, making the possibility of detecting its presence more plausible than ever before. As noted by several speakers, the Kepler mission is helping to find planets farther away from their stars, rather than just those that are close enough to cause their star to appear to wobble to us due to planetary gravity effects. The new more sensitive telescopes are better able to discern planets that are not only farther (meaning cooler) from their star, but smaller, some of which may have water and are rocky, making them more Earthlike and thus potentially more likely to posses the conditions necessary for the kind of life we know and understand.In addition to offerings talks, the conference also held panel discussions, interviews, and even screenings of movies, all aimed at opening the door to the possibility that extraterrestrial life might truly exist, and if it does, highlighting the fact that we are now in a better position than ever before to find evidence of its existence. Could 2012 be the year we find extraterrestrial life? Citation: Alien life searchers conference SETICon 2 held in Santa Clara (2012, June 25) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-06-alien-life-searchers-conference-seticon.htmllast_img read more

ITE dept to organise summit on Embedded Technology

first_imgKolkata: The state Information Technology and Electronics (IT&E) department will organise a summit on ‘Embedded Technology’ with various stakeholders from the state, industry and academia at the Biswa Bangla Convention Centre in New Town on Friday.State IT&E minister Bratya Basu will address the programme, which will cover the industry, research and development and other perspectives for this cutting-edge technology.”Embedded technology has an intrinsic link with the electronic industry and the job potential in this area across the globe is immense. It will rise further in the days to come. So, we have to ensure that the young generation of Bengal is prepared to embrace this new technology,” a senior official of the state IT&E department said. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsThe official added that embedded technology exists in smartphones, gaming consoles and 3D printing and knowledge regarding the technology is being felt to a large extent.It may be mentioned that Additional Chief Secretary of IT&E department Debashis Sen recently visited Taipei on the occasion of Computex 2018 and has witnessed that the country is progressing by leaps and bounds in modern age technologies like embedded technology.”This technology is relatively new and so, people need to undergo training and skill development to be prepared for it,” the official added. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedChief Minister Mamata Banerjee desires to build a hub for technology firms like Silicon Valley in the state and so, the state IT&E department is leaving no stones unturned to play a leading role in emerging IT technologies like Blockchain, Artificial Intelligence (AI), Embedded Technology, Robotics, IOT etc.”Our vision is to move towards a decentralised and transparent ecosystem, where the government and every industry will be able to leverage benefits of these emerging technologies,” the official said.The keynote speaker at the workshop will be Amlan Chakrabarti, dean of Calcutta University, who will be speaking on “Reconfigurable Computing for Embedded Technologies.”The day-long summit will witness eminent speakers from various government and private agencies, along with the nodal officers from all departments, directorates and statutory bodies .last_img read more