NOW HIRING 10 New Job Openings In Wilmington

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are some of the newest job openings in Wilmington:Full-Time/Part-Time Assistant Manager at Panera BreadPart-Time Package Handler at FedEx WarehouseFull-Time Compliance Services Associate at SOVOS ComplianceFull-Time Regulatory Specialist at SOVOS CompliancePart-Time Sales Associate at Nouria EnergyFull-Time Manager of Client Services at Serur AgenciesFull-Time Technician I at Charles River LabsFull-Time Program Manager at NuPath, Inc.Full-Time Delivery Driver at Keystone Automotive IndustriesFull-Time/Part-Time Crew Members & Shift Leaders at Dunkin Donuts(NOTE: Wilmington businesses — Feel free to send me your job postings at wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedNOW HIRING: 10 New Job Openings In WilmingtonIn “Business”NOW HIRING: 10 New Job Openings In WilmingtonIn “Business”NOW HIRING: 60 New Job Openings In Wilmington (Week of July 14, 2019)In “Business”last_img read more

Google Doodle pays tribute to Japanese inventor Seiichi Miyake

first_img Online Wellness Smart City Google When Seiichi Miyake found out a close friend was losing the ability to see clearly, he wanted to help. That desire led to an entirely new way for the visually impaired to navigate big cities, railways and parks. In 1965, Miyake invented the tactile paving slab (or “tenji block” in Japan) with his own money. Monday’s Google Doodle celebrates the introduction of the block 52 years ago.The doodle from March 18, 2019. Google The tenji blocks were first installed in the Japanese city of Okayama on March 18, 1967, next to a school for the blind, and they would go on to revolutionize the way the visually impaired interact with the world, making it safer and easier to get around public spaces independently.Miyake’s original design, which was installed in all Japan Railway platforms in the 1970s and rapidly found its way to cities across the globe, featured two tactile patterns that people with visual impairments can detect with a cane or through their feet — providing cues on which way they should head.Subway tracks in New York with the yellow tenji tiles.Subway tracks in New York with the yellow tenji tiles. Keith Getter/Getty Images One pattern features a series of raised lines that indicate “forward”. The second design is commonly referred to as the “truncated domes” pattern, a series of small bumps that act as a “stop” sign — typically at the edge of a train platform or before a motorway.A number of different patterns have been designed since, with smaller raised dots or more pill-shaped bumps signifying different directional cues. For instance, when the raised lines are horizontal in the direction of travel, that might mean “look out for steps ahead”. All of those cues, which many may not even notice as they wander through a city, are incredibly important for those with limited vision. 4:33 Share your voice Comments Now playing: Watch this: Google Doodle Google 49 Photos Tags Microsoft tech teaches children who are blind how to… Our favorite Google Doodles through the years 23last_img read more

Powerful storms hit USs California

first_imgA downed tree covers a parked vehicle during a winter storm in San Francisco. ReutersForecasters expect another half foot of rain to soak central and northern California and the Sierra Nevada mountains through early Tuesday, coming on the heels of powerful storms that walloped the state and other parts of the U.S. west on Sunday.The drenching rains and blowing snow flooded rivers and shut down roads from mudslides in a state that has struggled with drought for years.From 3 to 8 inches (7.6 to 20 cm) of rain is forecast in the region while several feet (1-2 metres) of snow are likely for higher elevations, said meteorologist Andrew Orrison at the National Weather Service’s Weather Prediction Center in Maryland.“We’re going to see heavy rain going into (Monday) evening and early morning,” he said.Heavy snow is expected in Nevada and the northern Rocky Mountains could get several feet of snow over the next day or two.The weather service said almost 40 rivers or creeks in Northern California and western Nevada were flooded or threatened to top their banks. But an emergency agency spokesman said there had been no reports of fatalities or serious damage.Authorities said a section of Interstate 80 near Truckee, southwest of Reno, Nevada, was closed by a mudslide.The upper Napa River north of San Francisco was expected to cause “extreme damage to all towns along the reach,” the California emergency agency said in a statement. Anticipated flooding brought voluntary evacuations in neighboring Sonoma County.Residents of Cambria, near the famous Hearst Castle along California’s central coast, were advised to move to higher ground due a flash flood warning.Several other California highways were closed from landslides or high water. In Washington state, high winds, ice and heavy snow shut roads and created hazardous driving conditions.Iridium Communications said Elon Musk’s SpaceX rocket company had delayed Monday’s launch of a Falcon 9 rocket carrying 10 of its satellites from Vandenberg Air Force Base, north of Los Angeles. The launch was now set for Saturday.The storm is drawing strength from the interaction between an “atmospheric river,” a plume of water vapor flowing from the tropics toward the West Coast, and a low-pressure area near Oregon, the National Weather Service said.After years of drought, the storm is the latest in a strong wet season for California that began in the autumn. Another front is expected on Tuesday.In an encouraging sign, the U.S. Forest Service said the rain had restored moisture levels in Southern California vegetation to a seasonal normal for the first time in five years.The eastern United States experienced low temperatures on Sunday, the day after a massive storm dumped snow from Georgia to Massachusetts.last_img read more

Hasina expects no help from Trump on Rohingya issue

first_imgBangladesh`s prime minister Sheikh Hasina speaks with a reporter during the United Nations General Assembly in New York City. Photo: ReutersBangladesh prime minister Sheikh Hasina said she spoke to US president Donald Trump on Monday about Rohingya Muslims flooding into her country from Myanmar, but she expects no help from him as he has made clear how he feels about refugees.As Trump left an event he hosted at the United Nations on reforming the world body, Hasina said she stopped him for a few minutes.“He just asked how is Bangladesh? I said ‘it’s doing very well, but the only problem that we have is the refugees from Myanmar’,” Hasina told Reuters in an interview. “But he didn’t make any comment about refugees.”A Myanmar military response to insurgent attacks last month in the country’s Rakhine state sent more than 410,000 Rohingya Muslims fleeing to neighboring Bangladesh, escaping what the United Nations has branded as ethnic cleansing.The Myanmar government says about 400 people have been killed in the fighting.Hasina, who is due to address the annual gathering of world leaders at the United Nations General Assembly on Thursday, said Trump’s stance on refugees was clear, so it was not worth asking him for help with the Rohingya Muslim refugees.“Already America declared that they will not allow any refugees,” she said. “What I can expect from them, and especially (the) president. He already declared his mind … so why I should ask?”“Bangladesh is not a rich country … but if we can feed 160 million people, another 500 or 700,000 people, we can do it.”A senior White House official was unaware of the exchange but said Trump was deeply interested in the subject and that “he would definitely engage if it were brought up.”Shortly after taking office in January, Trump tried to put a 120-day halt on the US refugee program, bar Syrian refugees indefinitely and impose a 90-day suspension on people from six predominantly Muslim countries.“The travel ban into the United States should be far larger, tougher and more specific-but stupidly, that would not be politically correct!” Trump said on Twitter on Friday.Trump says the move is needed to prevent terrorist attacks and allow the government to put in place more stringent vetting procedures. There is a key Supreme Court hearing next month on the constitutionality of his executive order on the ban.About a million Rohingya lived in Rakhine State until the recent violence. Most face travel restrictions and are denied citizenship in a country where many Buddhists regard them as illegal immigrants from Bangladesh.Hasina said she wanted to see more international political pressure on Myanmar to allow the Rohingya to return.“(Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi) should agree that these people belong to her country and that Myanmar is their country. They should take them back,” she said. “These people are suffering.”Nobel laureate Suu Kyi has faced a barrage of international criticism for not stopping the violence. Myanmar national security adviser Thaung Tun told Reuters on Monday that Myanmar would ensure those who left their homes could return, but there was “a process we have to discuss.”US Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley urged the Myanmar government to end military operations, grant humanitarian access, and commit to aiding the safe return of civilians to their homes.“People are still at risk of being attacked or killed, humanitarian aid is not reaching the people who need it, and innocent civilians are still fleeing across the border to Bangladesh,” Haley said after Britain hosted a meeting on the crisis in New York on Monday.A US deputy assistant secretary of state, Patrick Murphy, is due in Myanmar this week.last_img

Congress Looks To PostKatrina Tax Relief As Model For Harvey

first_img X Share Listen 00:00 /03:59 To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Andrew Schneider | Houston Public MediaRep. Kevin Brady touring NRG Center shelter with Harris County Judge Ed Emmett, Sen. John Cornyn, and Rep. Ted Poe & in background.On Labor Day, just about every member of the Houston-area congressional delegation descended on the shelter at NRG Center. One after another, Republicans and Democrats took the podium to pledge massive assistance for Texans devastated by Harvey.Then came Congressman Kevin Brady’s turn. “In addition to funding help, our communities will need tax help as well,” he said.Tax help is Brady’s specialty. He chairs the House Ways and Means Committee. Until Harvey struck, his main focus was cutting taxes for high-earners and corporations – popular with Republicans, anything but with Democrats. But Brady struck a different note here: “tax help that I imagine will include lifting the charitable contribution limits, so our businesses and families can continue to give to us as we rebuild in this time of crisis. Finding ways so there is easy access to retirement funds and retirement plans for rebuilding your home.”There’s a model for Brady’s proposals. After Hurricane Katrina decimated New Orleans, Congress passed the Katrina Emergency Tax Relief Act. It provides a clue for how Harvey tax relief might work in southeast Texas. One of its biggest provisions was to make it easier for people to write off property losses from storm damage.“In order to get a tax benefit from a casualty loss deduction, the amount of the loss would need to exceed 10 percent of their income,” says IRS spokesman Eric Smith. “So what Congress did for 2005 Hurricane Katrina, Rita and Wilma is to eliminate that threshold.” The Katrina law also helped filers get a refund sooner so they could rebuild.But economist John Edwards of Tulane University says there was a catch. “If your property is not worth that much,” says Edwards, “then that’s not really going to help you very much.”That’s a big concern for Congressman Al Green. Nearly a fifth of his constituents in southwest Houston live below the poverty line.“When these events occur,” says Green, “people who work for wages are hit very hard, especially when they occur to the extent that we experienced here with Harvey.”Green is co-sponsoring a bill by Austin Congressman Lloyd Doggett, the ranking Democrat on Ways and Means. Doggett’s bill would help low-income workers get bigger, quicker tax refunds via the Earned Income Tax Credit and the Child Tax Credit. It too uses Katrina tax relief as a model.Kevin Brady says he likes the idea, “so I’ve told Congressman Doggett I’m really eager to work with him.”Brady also wants to use tax credits to help businesses hire people who lost their jobs because of Harvey, as well as keep people they might otherwise have to lay off because of the storm. Such subsidies, another legacy of the Katrina tax bill, made a big difference to businesses in New Orleans.“Through this bill, Congress was saying, ‘We want our businesses there to come back. We want them to stabilize. We want them to hire the good people that they had before,’” says Jennifer Bernard-Allen, director of tax services at LaPorte CPAs and Business Advisors.“Certainly we need to bring businesses back. But we need to think also: who are these businesses going to employ?” says Tulane’s John Edwards. He says this is one area where post-Katrina legislation may provide little guidance. “New Orleans wouldn’t have come back anywhere near as quickly as it did had it not been for the influx of mainly Hispanic undocumented workers.”Undocumented immigrants were among the Houstonians worst hit by Harvey. Federal, state, and local officials have spent the past three weeks trying to reassure such residents that they can get help and that they won’t be deported if they do. But it’s far from clear how much of the post-Harvey tax relief they’ll ever see.last_img read more