Cant make it to Luftgekuhlt Lets talk about our favorite Porsche race

first_imgIt’s that time of year again where Porsche fanatics from all over the world gather in Southern California to celebrate Dr. Porsche’s magnificent machines. Luftgekuhlt is mostly a big party for 911 and 356 lovers, but all kinds of race cars show up, too.My favorite Porsche racing car is one that often gets forgotten when people start tossing around numbers like 917 and 935. It’s the 962 race cars of the 1980s and 1990s. These long, wide and low machines remained dominant in sports car racing much longer than just about anything else, and Porsche would have a lot fewer Le Mans wins without it.The 962 had kind of a weird childhood. It was designed at the last minute as a response to a rule change by the American racing organization IMSA. Explicitly, this change stated that a driver’s feet had to be located behind the car’s front axles and that made Porsche’s current world-beating sports prototype, the 956, ineligible. Car Culture 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better Porsche The 956 was introduced in 1982 as a replacement for Porsche’s 936 open-top race car. It was a savagely fast automobile, setting a lap record for the Nurburgring Nordschleife that stood from 1984 until 2018. It was also the first car to use Porsche’s PDK gearbox. The overall package of the 956 was incredibly successful, winning Le Mans outright four years in a row.That shows why Porsche, when updating the chassis to the 962 didn’t change an awful lot and why the two cars are pretty tough to tell apart when sitting next to one another. The Porsche 962 ran in several engine configurations during its long career, but it was always powered by a turbocharged flat-six engine and produced upward of 700 horsepower in some trims.The 962 models that ran in IMSA have a special place in my heart, as they are purely air-cooled and feature a massive scoop on the rear deck. Other versions, including the Le Mans-winning 962C, either featured water-cooled cylinder heads or were water-cooled entirely.So, if you’re unable to make it to Universal Studios’ backlot for Luftgekuhlt 6 today, kick back and enjoy some videos of one of the most dominant racecars the world has ever seen. Tags 0 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger value Post a comment 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous More From Roadshow Share your voice Porschelast_img read more

Concerns Surround New DC Sports Facility

first_imgPlans were presented Oct. 27 for a new sports facility for the Washington Wizards and Mystics on the campus of St. Elizabeths East. (Photo credit: dc.gov)Officials from Events DC, the District’s official tourism agency, and the office of the Deputy Mayor for Planning and Economic Development, presented plans Oct. 27 for a sports facility to be built on the campus of St. Elizabeths East at the R.I.S.E. Demonstration Center.“I am so excited about this project,” Mary Cuthbert, a longtime advisory neighborhood commissioner in Ward 8 and an outspoken advocate on behalf of the ward, said. “The Department of Transportation needs to come to us to explain some of the concerns we have about traffic but this great.”Taking the matter personally in the context of the facility, Cuthbert said “that if [the District government] don’t spend it [public funds] on me, they will spend it on someone else.”On Sept. 16, D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser (D) and Ted Leonsis, the primary owner of the Washington Wizards and the Washington Mystics, announced the construction of a 5,000 seat arena on a parcel of St. Elizabeths East near the Congress Heights Metro Station. The facility will serve as a practice spot for both the Wizards and the Mystics and the Mystics’ arena for games as well as its headquarters.“This facility will serve as a catalyst to transform this area of town and this entire ward,” Randall Boe, the executive vice president and general counsel of Monumental Sports and Entertainment, said. Boe said that Monumental will create a $10 million community fund for Ward 8 residents, non-profits and businesses.The facility, set to open in 2018, will also serve as a venue for entertainment programs and other athletic and cultural events, such as music concerts, conventions and meetings.Greg O’Dell, the president of Events DC, said his agency will put $27 million into project and the District government has agreed to fund the project at $23 million. He said the sports facility is one major part of the re-development of St. Elizabeths East and his office is working with Catherine Buell, the executive director of St. Elizabeths East, to see that this project is in concert with the overall plan for the site.However, O’Dell made it clear that Ward 8 residents will have plenty of input. “This is why we are here tonight to get feedback from the community,” he said.Buell said St. Elizabeths East is on track to build an Innovation Hub that could be anchored by Microsoft and other high-tech companies. The hub would spur the creation of new technology-related businesses and jobs, to create economic opportunity at all skill levels for residents.  Additionally, Buell said plans for affordable housing and retail opportunities are still in the works.Brenda Jones, a civic activist in Ward 8, said she is thrilled the sports facility is coming to the east of the Anacostia River, but that O’Dell needs to take one more step. “I think you should make this presentation to the schools,” she said.Rosalind Styles, a Ward 8 entrepreneur, suggested that a formal memorandum of understanding (MOU) be drafted by the community members on issues such as hiring ward residents and small business procurement and that it be presented to the developers of the facility. “Mary Cuthbert played a key role in drafting MOUs for the community’s benefit with D.C.’s Unified Communications System and the St. Elizabeths project and we should do the same with this,” Styles said. “We should put our hands and heads together to come up with a strategy for this.”Ward 8 businessman Phinis Jones said the facility will change the physical, business and cultural landscape of Ward 8.Some residents, such as We Act Radio co-founder Kymore Freeman, said the facility might not be a good fit for some ward residents. “I want this area of Congress Heights to be declared a ‘displacement zone’ before the arena is finished,” Freeman said. “We want a cap on property taxes for all existing Ward 7 and 8 businesses and we need a MOU to see that people will not be forced out of here because of this arena.”last_img read more