Following slow start to Big Ten slate Ohio State baseball facing mustwin

Sophomore infielder Jacob Bosiokovic (17) throws to 1st base during a game against Toledo April 2 at Bill Davis Stadium. OSU won, 7-2.Credit: Elliot Schall / Lantern photographerWhen the Big Ten announced the 2014 Big Ten Baseball Tournament was expanding to an eight-team field for the first time in conference history after previously having just six eligible teams, the Ohio State baseball team believed it could show up to Omaha, Neb., as the No. 1-seed.Now three weeks into its conference schedule, the Buckeyes might soon be thankful for that expansion.The Buckeyes (19-14, 2-7) currently sit 10th in the Big Ten standings heading into their weekend series at home against Penn State (16-14, 4-1, third in the Big Ten) Friday, a series some players are calling a must-win.Last year, OSU swept Penn State in a three-game series at Bill Davis Stadium.After the Buckeyes were swept in back-to-back weekends at home against Indiana and at Nebraska, they defeated Eastern Michigan, 8-1, Tuesday, and then were tripped up against Dayton the following day, losing 8-5.OSU’s closer and preseason All-American junior pitcher Trace Dempsey got a rare start against the Flyers in the hopes of building confidence after a lackluster start to the season. Dempsey has recorded a 6.23 ERA, four saves, given up 15 earned runs while tallying a 1-3 record in 21.2 innings pitched so far this year.After the loss to Dayton, Dempsey said the team cannot dwell on the past couple weeks and only look forward to its series against the Nittany Lions.“Clean slate from here on out. You can’t look back on the last two weekends or even today, you’ve got to move on to tomorrow,” Dempsey said. “All three of those games at Nebraska, it’s in the past. Nothing really to hang our heads on, just a couple plays here and there. It’s not like we could have won just one of those games, we easily should have won all three of those games.”The first pitcher OSU is set to send out to the mound against PSU is freshman Tanner Tully who has started the season with a 3-1 record and 1.91 ERA.With a 2-7 in-conference record, junior catcher Aaron Gretz said it is imperative the team comes out hot against PSU Friday.“It’s simple — we’ve got to win a series,” Gretz said. “It’s a must-win series. Our goal is to win all three games. Obviously that’s the goal for every weekend, but it’s magnified this weekend. We need to get some wins.”The opener against Penn State is scheduled for 6:35 p.m. Friday at Bill Davis Stadium. read more

Rule violations rolling in but not for Ohio State football

Click to enlargeThrough the first six months of 2014, the Ohio State football program self-reported six NCAA or Big Ten rules violations. In the following two months and 20 days, it reported none.In fact — through at least Sept. 20 — the football team hasn’t had a self-reported violation since April 22, or a span of nearly five months.Within that time span, junior defensive lineman Noah Spence reportedly failed a drug test — resulting in a violation of OSU and Big Ten rules — and was declared ineligible by the university for the Buckeyes’ Sept. 13 game against Kent State. Spence — who had not played this season because of a three-game suspension after a separate failed drug test — practiced once after the Kent State game, coach Urban Meyer said, but no further update on his status has been released.Since the most recent football violation, all of OSU athletics has self-reported 18 different violations, just one of which involved the men’s basketball program. In total, OSU has self-reported 30 NCAA or Big Ten rules violations this year up until Sept. 20.This information is the result of two separate public records requests submitted by The Lantern. The first was submitted July 8 and filled Aug. 11, while the second was requested Sept. 23 and filled Tuesday evening. The requests span the dates of Jan. 1 through Sept. 20.Despite lower numbers in recent months, the football program still has the most self-reported rules violations so far in 2014 with six. In total, 18 different athletic programs at OSU had self-reported violations listed among the records, with the institution being listed on a pair of violations.Seven of the teams had multiple violations listed, but only football and women’s rowing had more than two. The rowing team was named on four of the violations, two of which came on the more recent records request that spanned from July 1 through Sept. 20.Women’s rowing is the only OSU program to have self-reported multiple violations since July.Responses to the violations from OSU included issuing letters of education to the coaching staff for teams involved with the incidents, a restriction to one program’s financial aid capacity for the 2014-15 academic year and the repayment of $28 worth of “impermissible per diem” for multiple student-athletes.Regardless of punishment, the 30 violations all count as minor NCAA or Big Ten violations. But those 30 infractions still put OSU on track to hit about 40 for the year.OSU athletic director Gene Smith — who is know also the school’s vice president — said the athletics department usually has about 40 self-reported rules violations every year during an interview with The Lantern on May 15, 2012.“On an annual basis, we have about 40,” Smith said in the interview. “It ranges in that area we’re sitting at. In that 40 range is where we always hang.”Smith added that a lower number wouldn’t necessarily be a good thing for OSU.“Our whole thing is if we have 10 (violations), I’d have a problem,” he said. “I mean, I really would because people are going to make mistakes. And that means if I only have 10 out of 350 employees, 1,000 athletes — something’s not right.”While OSU does have one of the largest athletic departments in the nation, its number of violations comes in higher than some other programs. In the second half of 2013, the school self-reported around double the number of NCAA or Big Ten violations than five other schools in the conference.OSU has already self-reported more than double the violations that at least one other school with a major college football program reported during the 2013-14 year. According an Aug. 5 The Oregonian article, University of Oregon athletics self-reported just 14 violations in that academic year. read more

Bay Park house fire causes half a million dollars in damage

first_img Posted: June 27, 2018 Updated: 12:48 PM Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter June 27, 2018 Andrea Tobias center_img 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave Settings SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – A Bay Park house fire today caused an estimated $500,000 damage to the structure and $150,000 to contents, but nobody was hurt. No one was in the single-story residence on Dakota Drive, off Clairemont Drive, when San Diego Fire Department units arrived around 2:45 a.m. and began to tackle flames in the attic, SDFD spokeswoman Monica Munoz said.The fire was extinguished at 3:04 a.m. The blaze was confined to the attic, with smoke damage throughout the property, she said. The cause of the fire was under investigation. Fire crews spoke to the owner of the house, which was being remodeled, and determined that the residents were staying elsewhere and did not require assistance from the American Red Cross, Munoz said. Bay Park house fire causes half a million dollars in damage Andrea Tobias, last_img read more

Why You Should Consider an IT Audit

first_img Q: Does my company need an IT audit? Will it improve our bottom line?What about it? Nicole McMackin of Irvine Technology.Photo© Jeff ClarkA: Business owners looking for practical recommendations to improve or leverage their information technology (IT) and gain critical efficiencies should consider conducting an IT audit. “An IT audit is an in-depth analysis of a company’s technical environment, including its existing computer applications, hardware infrastructure, IT plan and IT-related personnel,” says Nicole McMackin, managing partner at Irvine Technology, a Santa Ana, Calif.-based company that conducts such audits for businesses around the world. “The audit usually results in a detailed written report and guide that recommend a strategic business initiative pertaining to rightsizing internal and external IT practices and systems.”We asked McMackin for the how, the why and the bottom-line benefits.When should business owners consider conducting an IT audit?When IT budgets are out of line with current economic conditions–notwithstanding timely strategic initiatives–and when IT isn’t meeting the basic reporting requirements necessary to make tactical decisions in a rapidly changing or competitive marketplace. Another time to consider an audit is when human resource issues cause factions of competing interests that aren’t consistent with strategic direction. And also when IT projects consistently overrun budgets or consistently don’t meet expectations.How can business owners figure out when their IT budgets are out of line with economic conditions?Unfortunately, there isn’t a formula. It’s more the ability of key executives to evaluate their current situation and adjust their strategic and tactical plans to match. What’s needed is a close look at IT expenditures to determine if they are justified. Warning signs are when sales remain moribund, cuts are imminent in other departments or there are overall reductions in the workplace.How can an IT audit help a company’s bottom line?A company that is well-positioned in its marketplace will often increase its IT budget in a recession to increase its competitiveness when the economy improves. But companies that are not so well-positioned–either because they have little or no expectation for an immediate turnaround in sales, or are unable to secure financing for day-to-day operations–will find that an audit will accurately determine if IT expenditures are sustainable and what should be considered for reduction in spending, mothballing or elimination.Can a business without an IT department benefit from an audit?When IT is an unknown entity, that’s perhaps the best time for a new or emerging business to conduct an audit. IT audits help answer many questions, including, “Do I need my own IT team?” This story appears in the February 2012 issue of . Subscribe » February 6, 2012 Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now 3 min read This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. Enroll Now for Freelast_img read more

first_img— Recommended Link Staged RevengeBut let’s turn to our familiar beat—the world of money. Or, more particularly, the world of deceit and delusion known as “economics.” Unromantic. Tawdry. But fascinating.Last week, we were looking at fake wars. As you know, these are wars that no one wants to win, since their real purpose is to shift wealth from the public to the war-fighting industries.Our point was that even fake wars sometimes spin out of control—when people forget what kind of war they’re fighting, for example.Early last week, U.S. President Donald J. Trump was taking the trade war far too seriously. Then, his Deep State handlers must have straightened him out on that; before the week was over, he declared that he wanted to get back into the Trans-Pacific Partnership!Then, he went off message again… this time, on the war on terrorism. A gas attack against civilians in Syria had been alleged; the president wanted to retaliate.As you know, no sparrow can fall anywhere on the planet without inviting a U.S. counterattack against the starlings. Observers wondered why the president didn’t wait to find out who had actually perpetrated the attack… if anyone. But they failed to understand the nature of fake war.It didn’t really matter whether any atrocities had been committed… or who had committed them. As it turned out, the gas attack was most likely fake. Perfect; the U.S. could stage a fake revenge attack, too!Russia was notified in advance of where and when the U.S. would attack, allowing time for the “enemy”—whoever they are—to make themselves scarce.The Donald had an opportunity to show what a tough, decisive leader he is without doing any real harm. It was all for the benefit of the fans… and, of course, the Deep State.So far, so good. Deep State WarThen, no sooner had we all relaxed when, on Sunday, a new war flared up—the war between Donald J. Trump and the Deep State itself.Many people think this war is real. Donald J. Trump, they believe, is fighting for “the people”… and the Deep State is trying to stop him. He really wants to drain the swamp, they say; it’s not his fault the water is getting deeper.Anything is possible.Mr. Trump’s instincts are clearly “populist”—he certainly understands the showbiz side much better than most politicians. But he is no fool.Hardly had the sun set on the polling stations in November 2016 when he invited the Wall Street insiders from Goldman Sachs… and a trio of retired generals… to join him in the White House.But there are many different factions in the Deep State. Like sows at a feeding trough, they bump into each other trying to get at the swill. And the winners are usually those that are most heavily armed.Leaping ahead, we notice that whenever there is a “populist” movement in politics, it almost always leads to the military wing of the Deep State taking control.Caesar, Lenin, Mao, Mussolini, Hitler, Perón, Castro—revolutions begun in the name of the “people” tend to degrade into military dictatorships.Why? Because government is always a way for the few to take advantage of the many… and the fraud is easier to pull off when you can invoke those atavistic “us versus them” emotions.The lumpen naturally rally ‘round the flag and support the military—no matter how absurd the situation.And if they don’t, you shoot them.Regards,Bill BonnerChairman, Bonner & PartnersJustin’s note: For years, Bill has warned about the “Deep State,” America’s unelected shadow government. But who is the Deep State? And how far does their reach extend? In this urgent video briefing, Bill shows you precisely what America’s shadowy insiders have planned… Watch it here.Reader MailbagToday, a reader shares his thoughts on Doug Casey’s interview on the coming comfortable dystopia…This is already being done in Canada. A person who refused to pay moving traffic violations and drove for five years without another one was pulled over for moving cats from his old address to his new address while one cat sat on his lap (he had 4 cats in the car—none of them in cages). Thus, his license to drive has been revoked until he pays the fines. Further, any moving traffic violation automatically increases his car insurance.I find it fiendishly clever for the rich and powerful to enshrine themselves confidentially into our political structure, which is currently destroying our Society. When communication and distance were major impediments to slavery, Society could survive. Such is no longer the case. This is why no matter what the government does, it will fail. Entropy has taken over. Further, China, doing what it is doing, is, in reality, preparing for the inevitable War.—PeterAs always, if you have any questions or suggestions for the Dispatch, send them to us right here.In Case You Missed It…Bill Bonner’s top technology expert, Jeff Brown, just said something shocking…Right now, a technology is being tested that has the potential to permanently cure thousands of diseases. It could even guarantee America’s energy independence for decades to come. It sounded too good to be true. But then we watched this presentation. Recommended Link —last_img read more

Investment in UK automotive sector plunges by a third

Brexit could cost nearly 500,000 UK jobs: study Investment in the British automotive industry fell by a third in 2017, its trade association said Wednesday as it called for a swift agreement on the Brexit transition period. Citation: Investment in UK automotive sector plunges by a third (2018, January 31) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-01-investment-uk-automotive-sector-plunges.html Explore further Britain’s Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders says it urgently needs clarity on the transitional arrangements for Brexit, after investment in the sector slumped in 2017 The Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders said that only £1.1 billion ($1.55 billion, 1.25 billion euros) of investment earmarked for vehicle and supply chain manufacturing was publicly announced last year.The figure is down 33.7 percent from £1.66 billion in 2016. It stood at £2.5 billion in 2015.”We urgently need clarity on the transitional arrangements for Brexit,” SMMT chief executive Mike Hawes told a press conference.Britain is due to leave the European Union at the end of March 2019.London and Brussels are yet to sort out the details of a transition period that could last until the start of 2021, intended to allow business time to adjust to whatever trading arrangements apply once the UK leaves the bloc.”For the transition, we must see business as usual—so staying in the single market, staying in the customs union,” said Hawes.Due to the uncertainties on the transition and the future trade relationship, “there is a general climate of hesitancy… and its political and economic impact is affecting consumer and business confidence”.The mood weighed on new car sales in Britain in 2017.They fell for the first time in six years, on plummeting demand for diesel-powered vehicles and as Brexit-fuelled inflation hit spending.Total sales dropped 5.7 percent to 2.54 million vehicles, the first annual drop since 2011—as consumers ditched diesel cars for those seen as more environmentally friendly, according to the SMMT.A similar sales drop is expected in 2018, said Hawes.As a result, production dropped by three percent in 2017, to 1.67 million cars.Production for export declined by 1.1 percent, while in Britain, demand declined by 9.8 percent.The UK car industry employs 169,000 people in manufacturing alone and 814,000 across the wider industry, accounting for 13 percent of total UK export goods, says the SMMT.The dependence on exports—at 80 percent of total production, with more than half going to the rest of the EU—makes it all the more imperative, according to the SMMT, to strike a swift agreement between London and Brussels.A government spokesman said: “The UK’s automotive industry remains a great British success story and global demand for UK designed, engineered and manufactured cars and engines remains strong.”The UK is the third largest European car producer and has the highest productivity in Europe amongst the major automotive producing nations.” © 2018 AFP This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more